Sunday, March 9, 2008

The Most Common Sight This Season

Has been this: the rest of the field looking at Kyle Busch's back bumper. I know the FOX guys have been practically slobbering on Kyle this year, but the guy's earned the attention. He's won 2 truck races and won his first Cup race of the year today, but more than that has been the way he's driven. I have to give him his due. More on Atlanta and looking ahead to Bristol this week.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

Didnt he bend the rear end housing in the middle of the race? That says somethin about how fast that car is

David said...

Yeah, he's quite a boy this year. Do you think he'll take all three titles? Pure smoke.

Dan said...

National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing.

Not the International association. It just so happens that the great nation we live in is the United States of America. Unless Japan has joined the Union without the publics knowledge, a Toyota has no business racing along side an American make. I realize that a loophole was exploited and under the stickers, all the cars are the same. But the fact that a Camry won last week's race has turned away at least one fan.
I am sure this is not a sentiment that I have sole possession of. Many other fans are bound to turn away from this sport and find another past time. Being from Michigan, I suppose gives me a deeper insight into the working and effects of the auto industry. As the domestic auto market share is cut, so are jobs. At one time my home state was a financial powerhouse, good jobs, good schools, new houses, and highways. People would move to the Midwest seeking work, blue collar workers, hard working people. Since the rise of foreign autos in this country, Michigan and a good deal of the Midwest have seen hard times. Have you ever watched the Micheal Moore film, "Roger and Me"? If not, watch it, and if so watch it again. This is not only happening with the "Big Three", but with all the suppliers that make parts for Ford, GM and Chrysler. Hundreds of these smaller companies have cut back or shut down because of lack of work. Perhaps on the Coasts and the Deep South, the effects of the dying American auto industry are not so apparent. But here in the Heartland you would be hard pressed to find an individual who doesn't know someone that has not been affected by the auto industry cut-backs.
Sure, some Japanese autos are assembled in the US, but the only jobs are primarily hourly and middle management jobs. The profits still go back to Japan where they are spent and invested. Keep our money at home and stop promoting the erosion of America's economy.

I WILL NOT BE WATCHING ANY MORE RACES OR PURCHASING ANY MORE MERCHANDISE
I WILL BE SENDING THIS E-MAIL TO EVERY ONE IN MY ADDRESS BOOK AND POSTING IT ANYWHERE I CAN

Signed,
An Ex-Fan